NEB&W Guide to D&H Steam Locomotives - Numerical Roster

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Use this listing to find out where a particular loco is discussed in more detail. (Not very complete yet.)



1-9

No. 1

  • Although the other predecessors of the D&H, like the Rensselaer & Saratoga, were getting steam locos during the early years, the D&H itself went about being a canal company. (The above locos were to move coal across from one plane to another in the hilly section of Pennsylvania, with canals being used on the flat section.) It wasn't until 1860 that the D&H purchased two locos for use on "flat land" railroading, a 4-4-0 and an 0-4-0, the Major Sykes, a.k.a. no. 1, built by W. Cook & Co. of PA.
In 1872, the Major Sykes was rebuilt to an 0-6-0.
Not sure when it was scrapped.



  • I believe this is a photo of no. 01, a saddletank 0-6-0. Don't think this is a rebuild of the Major Sykes, despite the reuse of the number.



  • No. 1 (third use of this number) was also a saddle tank 0-6-0, not unlike the MDC or Bachmann loco.



No. 2

  • The E.A Quintard, no. 2 or 7 (take your pick), was a 4-4-0 built by Dickson in 1867, and rode on 63-inch drivers. (Apparently the loco at some point was so numbered, I think no. 2 first.)
By 1900, it had been renumbered 359. This was a G-2 class loco - see that section for more info.
Okay, I think this loco was acquired second-hand, and was Union Coal Co. no. 2, renumbered 7 on the D&H.
I also understand it was sold to the Long Island in 1901 or 1907.

  • No. 2, second use of this number, was later a 4-4-0 built by Dickson in 1874, renumbered 351 in 1899.

No. 3

  • No. 3 was an 0-4-0 saddletank loco (with a tender), built by Cook in 1861. At various times it was also named Honesdale, Terrapin, and Fine Plume, although what order and when the names changed isn't clear. This loco was built for the D&H's gravity railroad and was retired in 1899.



  • No. 3 (second use of the number) was originally no. 163, an 0-6-0 tank engine, class B, built by Dickson in 1888. It rode on 47-inch drivers. It was rebuilt (and I guess renumbered) in 1898.
In 1898, the loco was rebuilt by the D&H with "regular tanks" applied about 1901.
It was scrapped in 1925.



No. 4

  • I believe the Lackawanna, an 0-6-0, was numbered no. 4. It was built by Dickson in 1862, I would assume for the D&H and not a predecessor. It burned anthracite but wasn't a camelback. It had tiny 42-inch drivers.
Also have a built date of 1852.

  • D&H no. 4 was built by Dickson in 1884, rebuilt in 1894, renumbered 411 by 1902. I don't have the wheel arrangement.

No. 5

  • No. 5, the Isaac N. Seymour, was a 4-4-0 built by New Jersey Locomotive. It exploded in 1879 at Carbondale and sold to Dickson.

  • No. 5 was also an 0-6-0 camelback.



No. 7

  • The E.A Quintard, no. 2 or 7 (take your pick), was a 4-4-0 built by Dickson in 1867, and rode on 63-inch drivers. (Apparently the loco at some point was so numbered, I think no. 2 first.)
By 1900, it had been renumbered 359. This was a G-2 class loco - see that section for more info.
Okay, I think this loco was acquired second-hand, and was Union Coal Co. no. 2, renumbered 7 on the D&H.
I also understand it was sold to the Long Island in 1901 or 1907.

  • No. 7, second use of this number, was a class B 0-6-0, built by Dickson in 1884 as no. 214, a tank engine with 47 inch drivers. In 1898, it was rebuilt by the D&H with "regular tanks" applied about 1901 and the tank was removed in 1914. Not sure when it was renumbered from no. 214 to no. 7.
Loco was scrapped in 1928.



No. 8

  • No. 8, the J.J. Albright, was a 4-4-0, built by Dickson in 1867. It rode on 56-inch drivers.

  • No. 8, second use of this number, was a camelback 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1870, riding on 57-inch drivers. (Seems like the two number 8's overlapped.) In 1898, it was rebuilt. It was renumbered at some point to no. 270, and finally no. 119. It was retired in 1923.
    See the C-1m section for more info.

10's

No. 10

  • No. 10, the R. Manville, was built by Dickson in 1867-'68, and rode on 63 inch drivers. In 1899, it was renumbered 352.



No. 11

  • D&H no. 11, the James Dickson, was a a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1869.



No. 12

  • D&H no. 12, the Coe F. Young, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1870.



No. 13

  • D&H no. 13, the Charles N. Talbot, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1870.



No. 14

  • D&H no. 14, the Plymouth, was either an 0-6-0 or a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1870.



No. 15

  • D&H no. 15, the Willie Olyphant, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1871. (There was also a loco named Harwood Olyphant.)



No. 16

  • D&H no. 16, the George Dickson, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1871.

  • No. 16, second use of this number, was a class B-1a single cab 0-6-0 built by Dickson in 1891 as no. 320.
    See the B-1a section for more info.



No. 17

  • D&H no. 17, the J.B. Van Bergen, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1872. At some point it was renumbered 81. It was either class C-1l or C-1i.



  • No. 17, second use of this number, was a saddletank 0-4-0 orginally no. 209, a.k.a. Utica built by Dickson in 1883. It was class A-1a.



No. 18

  • D&H no. 18, the Pierce Butler, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1872.



No. 19

  • D&H no. 19, the A.M. Atkinson, was a 2-6-0 built by Dickson in 1873.